Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-9glht Total loading time: 0.153 Render date: 2021-07-24T06:08:21.615Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

TiSi2 Phase Transformation by Amorphization Techniques

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Tord Karlin
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S-164 40 Stockholm, Sweden, tord@ele.kth.se
Martin Samuelsson
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S-164 40 Stockholm, Sweden, tord@ele.kth.se
Stefan Nygren
Affiliation:
Ericsson Components AB, S-164 81 Stockholm, Sweden, ekastny@eka.ericsson.se
Mikael östling
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S-164 40 Stockholm, Sweden, tord@ele.kth.se
Corresponding
Get access

Abstract

ULSI packing density calls for sub-micron line widths, but on n-type polysilicon this can lead to incomplete titanium silicide C49 to C54 phase transformation after a conventional two step rapid thermal anneal (RTA). This study compares three different ion beam amorphization techniques: preamorphization, ion beam mixing and silicide amorphization, aiming at a complete phase transformation for submicron silicide lines. For preamorphization, an arsenic implantation at moderate energies (35–75 keV) was used to amorphize the top layer of the polysilicon prior to the titanium deposition. Ion beam mixing used a high-energy (200 keV) arsenic implantation after the titanium deposition to create an amorphous mix of silicon and titanium. These two methods did, each by themselves, lead to an increased fraction of C54 silicide grains already during the low temperature RTA, and a complete phase transformation during the subsequent high temperature RTA. Both methods lowered the thickness difference between titanium silicide on p- and n-type silicon. Silicide amorphization with 75 keV arsenic or 100 keV antimony, applied before the second RTA, did not significantly improve the silicide phase transformation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Beyers, R., Coulman, D., and Merchant, P., J. Appl. Phys 61, 5110 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Sakai, I., Abiko, H., Kawaguchi, H., Hirayama, T., Johansson, L. E. G., and Okabe, K., IEDM Tech. Digest, 66 (1992).Google Scholar
3. Mann, R. W., Miles, G. L., Knotts, T. A., Rakowski, D. W., Clevenger, L. A., Harper, J. M. E., d'Heurle, F. M., and Jr, C. C.., Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 3729 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Miles, G. L., Mann, R. W., and Bertsch, J. E., Thin Solid Films 290–291, 469 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Ohguro, T., Nakamura, S.-I., Koike, M., Morimoto, T., Nishiyama, A., Ushiku, Y., Yoshitomi, T., Ono, M., Saito, M., and Iwai, H., IEEE Trans. Electr. Dev. 41, 2305 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Svensson, B. G., Jagadish, C., Hallön, A., and Lalita, J., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 106, 183 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Caturla, M. J., Rubia, T. D. d. l., and Gilmer, G. H., Instr, Nucl.. and , Meth. in Phys. Res. B 106, 1 (1995).Google Scholar
8. Linnros, J., Svensson, B., and Holmön, G., Phys. Rev. B 30, 3629 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Ma, Z. and Allen, L. H., J. Appl. Phys 77, 4384 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

TiSi2 Phase Transformation by Amorphization Techniques
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

TiSi2 Phase Transformation by Amorphization Techniques
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

TiSi2 Phase Transformation by Amorphization Techniques
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *