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Thermoelectric Study of Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

G. U. Sumanasekera
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A.
C. K. W. Adu
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A.
B. K. Pradhan
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A.
G. Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A.
H. E. Romero
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A.
P. C. Eklund
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A.
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Abstract

In situ resistivity and thermoelectric power (S) have been used to study the nature of the adsorption of hydrogen in bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes for H2 pressure P <1 atm and temperatures 77 K<T<500 K. Isothermal plots of S vs. Δρ/ρ0 are found to exhibit linear behavior as a function of gas coverage, consistent with a physisorption process. Studies of S, ρ at T = 500 K as a function of pressure exhibit a plateau at a pressure P~40 Torr, the same pressure where the H % measurements suggest the highest binding energy sites are being saturated. The effects of H2 exposure at 500 K on the thermoelectric transport properties are fully reversible.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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