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Thermally Controlled Shape-Memory Investigations of Nanocomposites Based on Oligo(ω-pentadecalactone) and Magnetic Nanoparticles Acting as Crosslinks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2015

M. Yasar Razzaq
Affiliation:
Institute of Biomaterial Science and Berlin-Brandenburg Centre for Regenerative Therapies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Kantstr. 55, 14513 Teltow, Germany
M. Behl
Affiliation:
Institute of Biomaterial Science and Berlin-Brandenburg Centre for Regenerative Therapies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Kantstr. 55, 14513 Teltow, Germany
A. Lendlein
Affiliation:
Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
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Abstract

Covalent integration of inorganic nanoparticles into polymer matrices leads to a homogenization of their distribution and enhances the structural properties. Here, we report on a thermally-controlled reversible shape-memory effect (R-SME) of magnetic nanocomposites under stress-controlled conditions. The magnetic nanocomposites consisted of an oligo(ω-pentadecalactone) (OPDL) matrix with covalently integrated or physically added magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). The R-SME of these materials was based on crystallization-induced elongation (CIE) and melting-induced contraction (MIC) under a constant stress in thermomechanical experiments. Furthermore, the adjustability of the recovery stress in magnetic nanocomposites as a function of MNP content was investigated. A slight increase in the recovery stress from 0.9 MPa for pure OPDL network to 1.2 MPa for H-NC containing 9 wt% of covalently integrated MNP was observed.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

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Thermally Controlled Shape-Memory Investigations of Nanocomposites Based on Oligo(ω-pentadecalactone) and Magnetic Nanoparticles Acting as Crosslinks
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Thermally Controlled Shape-Memory Investigations of Nanocomposites Based on Oligo(ω-pentadecalactone) and Magnetic Nanoparticles Acting as Crosslinks
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