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Texture Memory Effect During Heat Treatment in the Heavily Cold Rolled Ni3Al Foils

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Masahiko Demura
Affiliation:
DEMURA.Masahiko@nims.go.jp, National Institute for Materials Science, Fuel Cell Materials Center, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, 305-0047, Japan, +81-29-859-2547, +81-29-859-2501
Ya Xu
Affiliation:
XU.Ya@nims.go.jp, National Institute for Materials Science, Fuel Cell Materials Center, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047, Japan
Kyosuke Kishida
Affiliation:
k.kishida@materials.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp, Kyoto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan
Toshiyuki Hirano
Affiliation:
HIRANO.Toshiyuki@nims.go.jp, National Institute for Materials Science, Fuel Cell Materials Center, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047, Japan
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Abstract

Texture evolution during grain growth was examined in the 84% cold-rolled Ni3Al with a Goss texture, {110}<001>, using the electron backscatter diffraction method. By recrystallization at 873K/0.5h, the texture was disintegrated and composed of several orientations, most of which had a 40° rotation relationship about <111> to the Goss orientation. Also, a small number of the Goss grains existed. With grain growth, the Goss grains grew faster than the 40°<111> rotated grains, leading to the texture reversion to the original, Goss texture. This phenomenon can be referred to Texture memory effect. In the early stage of the grain growth, the preferential growth occurred on the Goss grains surrounded by the 40°<111> rotated grains. It can be thus ascribed to the high mobility of 40°<111> grain boundary. In the late stage, the Goss grains were adjacent to each other and the preferential growth was accelerated. It is considered that the adjacent Goss grains survived in the grain coalescence process since the boundary between them are low angle boundary having a low energy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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