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Texture Formation in High Niobium Containing TiAl Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Andreas Stark
Affiliation:
stark@tu-harburg.deHamburg University of TechnologyInstitute of Materials Science and TechnologyEißendorfer Str. 42Hamburg D-21073Germany
Arno Bartels
Affiliation:
bartels@tu-harburg.de, Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Eißendorfer Str. 42, Hamburg, D-21073, Germany
Frank-Peter Schimansky
Affiliation:
Frank-Peter.Schimansky@gkss.de, GKSS-Research Centre, Institute for Materials Research, Max-Plank-Str. 1, Geesthacht, D-21502, Germany
Helmut Clemens
Affiliation:
helmut.clemens@unileoben.ac.at, Montanuniversität Leoben, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Franz-Josef-Str. 18, Leoben, A-8700, Austria
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Abstract

Texture formation was studied in high Nb bearing g-TiAl based alloys with compositions of Ti-45Al-(5,7.5,10)Nb-(0,0.5)C (compositions are in atomic percent). In order to start with texture-free material hot-isostatically pressed powder compounds were used. The deformation was performed either in uniaxial compression or by hot rolling. After compression at 700 °C and 800 °C fiber textures with <110> and <302> components occur. These deformation textures can be verified by computer simulations using a yield surface model of g-TiAl. With higher deformation temperatures the <110> fiber vanishes and new accumulations of orientations are formed, which are due to dynamic recrystallization.

Hot rolling was performed at temperatures in the upper part of the (a+g) phase field and, therefore, with more than 50% a-phase existing. The co-deformation of a- and g-phase during rolling leads to correlated components in the independently measured textures of both phases. The texture of the g-phase shows a maximum of orientation around the Goss2 component and the texture of the a-phase exhibits an orientation maximum around the transversal component. The correlation is the Blackburn orientation relation, although the textures are not caused by phase transformations, but by co-deformation. Hot rolling with many passes and reheating between the passes lead to the formation of a cube component with an alignment of the c-axes in transverse direction. In general, this is a typical recrystallization-induced component in hot rolled TiAl.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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