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Synthesis of Nanosized Polymer Particles in Nonaqueous Emulsion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2013

Robert Dorresteijn
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
Robert Haschick
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
Kevin Müller
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
Markus Klapper*
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
Klaus Müllen
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
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Abstract

In nonaqueous emulsion, moisture-sensitive polymerizations are performed in order to generate nanoparticles, which are not accessible by common aqueous emulsion polymerization. A nonaqueous emulsion, consisting of two immiscible aprotic organic solvents, is stabilized by amphiphilic block copolymers, such as PIb-PEO or PIb-PMMA copolymer, and lead to formation of nanosized dispersed droplets. They act as dispersed “nanoreactors” for the one-step synthesis of poly(urethane) nanoparticles in a polyadditon reaction as well as poly(L-lactide) nanoparticles through ring-opening polymerization, catalyzed by a moisture-sensitive catalyst. The well-dispersed particles possess average diameters below 100 nm and have narrow size distributions owing to the long-term stability of the dispersed droplets in the continuous phase.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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