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Synthesis and Characterization of Antiferromagnetic Kmnf3 Nanoparticles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

C. Sangregorio
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Research Institute University of New Orleans, New Orleans LA USA
E. E. Carpenter
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Research Institute University of New Orleans, New Orleans LA USA
C. J. O'connor
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Research Institute University of New Orleans, New Orleans LA USA
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Abstract

The magnetic properties of nanosized antiferromagnetic particles of KMnF3 are presented. The particles were synthesized using the microemulsion technique, i.e. by using the aqueous core of reverse micelles as constrained microreactors for the precipitation of the particles. The structural characterization of the samples, accomplished by TEM and XRD, reveal that the samples consist of cubic-shaped, crystalline KMnF3 nanoparticles of uniform size. Control over the average size of the particles was achieved by changing the reaction time. Four different samples of average size in the range 13-35 nm were prepared. DC magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed superparamagnetic behavior of the particles. Hysteresis loops measured after field cooling the samples through TN were shifted. The shift is ascribed to the exchange coupling between the antiferromagnetic core of the particles and the uncompensated spin shell surrounding it.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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