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Synroc Production using a Fluid Bed Calciner

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

F. Jay Ackerman
Affiliation:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
John Z. Grens
Affiliation:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
Frederick J. Ryerson
Affiliation:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
Clarence L. Hoenig
Affiliation:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
Fernando Bazan
Affiliation:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
John H. Campbell
Affiliation:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
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Abstract

Synroc is a titanate-based ceramic developed for immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes in solid form. Fluid bed Synroc production permits slurry drying, calcining and redox to be carried out in a single unit. We present results of studies from two fluid beds; the Idaho Exxon internally-heated unit and the externally-heated unit constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Bed operation over a range of temperature, feed rate, fluidizing rate and redox conditions indicate that high density, uniform particle-size Synroc powders are produced which facilitate the densification step and give HUP parts with dense, well-developed phases and good leaching characteristics.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1983

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References

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