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Surface Electrons in Inverted Layers of p-HgCdTe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Samuel E. Schacham
Affiliation:
NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 Department of Electrical Engineering and Solid State Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel. This work was done while this author held a National Research Council - NASA Research Associateship
Eliezer Finkman
Affiliation:
NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 Department of Electrical Engineering and Solid State Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel. This work was done while this author held a National Research Council - NASA Research Associateship
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Abstract

Anodic oxide passivation of p-type HgCdTe generates an inversion layer. Extremely high Hall mobility data for electrons in this layer indicated the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas. This is verified by use of the Shubnikov-de Haas effect from 1.45-4.15K. Data is extracted utilizing a numerical second derivative of DC measurement. Three sub-bands are detected. Their relative occupancies are in excellent agreement with theory and with experimental results obtained on anodic oxide as accumulation layers of n-type HgCdTe. The effective mass derived is comparable to expected.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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