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Substrate Temperature Dependence of the Structural Properties of Glow Discharge Produced a-Ge:H

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Scott J. Jones
Affiliation:
Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
Susanne M. Lee
Affiliation:
Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
Warren A. Turner
Affiliation:
Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
William Paul
Affiliation:
Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
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Abstract

A series of glow discharge a-Ge:H films has been produced at substrate temperatures, Ts, between 100 and 350°C. The films were structurally characterized using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Gas Evolution (GE), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The DSC and GE results are substrate dependent. Two exothermic peaks are seen in DSC spectra for films deposited on aluminum foil while only one peak, identified by Raman measurements as the crystallization peak, is seen for samples deposited on beryllium, NaCl, carbon coated mica, crystalline silicon and 7059 glass. The crystallization peak temperature of films deposited on 7059 glass decreases with increasing Ts until 250°C where it then remains constant up to Ts=350°C. GE results show a relative increase of high temperature evolution with an increase in Ts. A well defined island/tissue structure seen in TEM micrographs of low Ts films disappears at higher Ts values. SEM measurements show columnar structure present only in films produced at Ts≤250°C. All the structural measurements point to a more stable material of higher density for Ts>250°C.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1989

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