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Study of Protein Adsorption onto a Polymer Film by in-situ UV Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Maria-Antoaneta Bratescu
Affiliation:
maria@eco-t.esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, Nagoya University, Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya, Japan
Syohei Fujita
Affiliation:
fujita@eco-t.esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, Nagoya University, Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya, Japan
Nagahiro Saito
Affiliation:
hiro@eco-t.esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, Nagoya University, Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Nagoya, Japan
Osamu Takai
Affiliation:
maria@eco-t.esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, Nagoya University, Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya, Japan
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Abstract

Our work presents results on human plasma protein adsorption onto a polyacrylic acid (PAA) film prepared via surface wave plasma (SWP) induced graft polymerization. The PAA film prepared in this manner is characterized by a carboxyl functional group and a constant contact angle in water of 35°. The adsorption kinetics of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) and human serum albumin (HSA) proteins were measured by in-situ UV-ATR spectroscopy. The free energy of adsorption on PAA treated as well as untreated surfaces was −28 kJ M−1 and −22 kJ M−1 for HPF and HSA, respectively, regardless of surface chemistry. We determined that 14 μM and 6 μM HPF concentrations are enough to cover half of the maximum possible of surface coverage on silica and PAA film, respectively. HSA protein concentrations of 154 μM and 118 μM are enough to cover half of the maximum accessible surface of silica and PAA film, respectively. For surface treatment of implants with PAA polymer and protein, the necessary protein concentration for effective surface coverage should be known.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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Study of Protein Adsorption onto a Polymer Film by in-situ UV Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy
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