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Structural Approach to Improve the Response Characteristics of Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Film-Based NO 2 Gas Sensor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Tadashi Nagasawa
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Electronic Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432, Shizuoka, JAPAN
Kenji Murakami
Affiliation:
Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432, Shizuoka, JAPAN, k-murakami@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp
Kenzo Watanabe
Affiliation:
Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432, Shizuoka, JAPAN, k-murakami@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp
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Abstract

In order to realize a high-sensitivity, low temperature operable NO2 gas sensor, thin films of at-form copper phthalocyanine (α-CuPc) have been deposited by vacuum sublimation. In this study, we have attempted to improve the gas-sensing characteristics through a modification of the film microstructure. Firstly, the gas sensitivity is remarkably increased by an insertion of higher-sensitive layer (vanadyl Pc film) between the α-CuPc film and the glass substrate in the low gas concentration range. Secondly, a reversibility in cycles of gas doping and dedoping is improved by film deposition on hydrofluoric acid-treated substrate. It is found from atomic force microscope analyses that this phenomenon may be closely related to a modification of the film microstructure.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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