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Stereocomplex PMMA Fibers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Matija Crne
Affiliation:
matija.crne@chemistry.gatech.eduGeorgia Institute of TechnologySchool of Chemistry and BiochemistryAtlanta GA 30332United States
Jung O Park
Affiliation:
jung.park@ptfe.gatech.edu, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering, Atlanta, GA, 30332, United States
Shin-Woong Kang
Affiliation:
sKang1@kent.edu, Kent State University, Department of Physics, Kent, OH, 44240, United States
Satyendra Kumar
Affiliation:
Satyen@xray.kent.edu, Kent State University, Department of Physics, Kent, OH, 44240, United States
Mohan Srinivasarao
Affiliation:
mohan@ptfe.gatech.edu, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering, Atlanta, GA, 30332, United States
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Abstract

We have utilized the fact that syndiotactic and isotactic Poly(methyl methacrylate) {PMMA} form a stereocomplex to spin semi-crystalline PMMA fibers. Our goal is to produce oriented semi-crystalline fibers with a high enough melting point to withstand atactic-PMMA processing conditions. We successfully developed stereocomplex PMMA fibers by wet spinning and gel spinning, and characterized their properties by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical/electron microscopy, mechanical testing and X-ray crystallography. Stereocomplex fibers from gel spinning have highest melting points and polymer chain orientation, hence are the best reinforcing agents. We are currently working on producing self-reinforced composites using these fibers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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