Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-c97xr Total loading time: 0.617 Render date: 2022-05-28T14:54:30.905Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The SR 97 Safety Assessment of a KBS 3 Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel – Overview, Review Comments and New Developments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Allan Hedin
Affiliation:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company P.O. Box 5864, SE-102 40 Stockholm, Sweden
Ulrik Kautsky
Affiliation:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company P.O. Box 5864, SE-102 40 Stockholm, Sweden
Lena Morén
Affiliation:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company P.O. Box 5864, SE-102 40 Stockholm, Sweden
Patrik Sellin
Affiliation:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company P.O. Box 5864, SE-102 40 Stockholm, Sweden
Jan-Olof Selroos
Affiliation:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company P.O. Box 5864, SE-102 40 Stockholm, Sweden
Get access

Abstract

In preparation for coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB has carried out the longterm safety assessment SR 97, requested by the Swedish Government. The repository is of the KBS-3 type, where the fuel is placed in isolating copper canisters with a high-strength cast iron insert. The canisters are surrounded by bentonite clay in individual deposition holes at a depth of 500 m in granitic bedrock. Geological data are taken from three sites in Sweden to shed light on different conditions in Swedish granitic bedrock.

The future evolution of the repository system is analysed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings, including climate, persist. The four other scenarios show the evolution if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, in the event of earthquakes, and in the event of future inadvertent human intrusion.

The principal conclusion of the assessment is that the prospects of building a safe deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Swedish granitic bedrock are very good. The results of the assessment also serve as a basis for formulating requirements and preferences regarding the bedrock in site investigations, for designing a programme for site investigations, for formulating functional requirements on the repository's barriers, and for prioritisation of research.

SR 97 has been reviewed both by an international group of OECD/NEA experts and by Swedish authorities. The NEA reviewers concluded that “SR 97 provides a sensible illustration of the potential safety of the KBS-3 concept”, and no issues were identified that need to be resolved prior to proceeding to the investigation of potential sites. The authorities' conclusions were in principal consistent with those of the NEA.

Uncertainties and lack of knowledge in different areas identified in SR 97 have strongly influenced the contents and structure of SKBs most recent research programme, RD&DProgramme 2001.

Since SR 97, the methodology for probabilistic consequence analyses have been further developed. Analytic approximations to the numerical transport models used in SR 97 have been developed. The new models have been used to extend the probabilistic calculations in SR 97.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company, “SR 97 - Post-closure safety”, Main report Volumes I and II, SKB Technical Report, TR-99-06; Stockholm, Sweden (1999).Google Scholar
2. Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company, “SR 97 - Post-closure safety”, Summary, SKB Technical Report, TR-99-06; Stockholm, Sweden (1999).Google Scholar
3. Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company, “SR 97 - Processes in the repository evolution”, SKB Technical Report, TR-99-07, Stockholm, Sweden (1999).Google Scholar
4. Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company, “SR 97 - Waste, repository design and sites”, SKB Technical Report, TR-99-08, Stockholm, Sweden (1999).Google Scholar
5. andersson, J., “Data and data uncertainties. Compilation of data and data uncertainties for radionuclide transport calculations”, SKB Technical Report, TR-99-09, Stockholm, Sweden (1999).Google Scholar
6. Swedish nuclear power inspectorate, “SKI's and SSI's Joint Review of SKB's Safety Assessment Report, SR 97”, Summary, SKI Report 01:3, Stockholm, Sweden (2001), SSI Report 2001:02, Stockholm, Sweden (2001).Google Scholar
7.Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, “SR 97: Post-closure safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. An international peer review”, Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris France, (2000).Google Scholar
8. Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company, “RD&D Programme 2001”, SKB Technical Report, TR-01-30, Stockholm, Sweden (2001).Google Scholar
9. Hedin, A., “Integrated Analytic Radionuclide Transport Model for a Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository in Saturated Fractured Rock”, Nuclear Technology 138, 2 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Hedin, A., “Probabilistic Dose Calculations and Sensitivity Analyses Using Analytic Models”, Accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering and System Safety (2001).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The SR 97 Safety Assessment of a KBS 3 Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel – Overview, Review Comments and New Developments
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The SR 97 Safety Assessment of a KBS 3 Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel – Overview, Review Comments and New Developments
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The SR 97 Safety Assessment of a KBS 3 Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel – Overview, Review Comments and New Developments
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *