Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-h2zp4 Total loading time: 0.43 Render date: 2021-09-23T03:52:28.204Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Sol-Gel Optical Sensors for Glutamate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Jenna L. Rickus
Affiliation:
Neuroengineering University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A
Esther Lan
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A
Allan J. Tobin
Affiliation:
Brain Research Institute University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A
Jeffery I. Zink
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A
Bruce Dunn
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A
Get access

Abstract

The amino acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter used in the nervous system for interneuronal communication. It is used throughout the brain by various neuronal pathways including those involved in learning and memory, locomotion, and sensory perception. Because glutamate is released from neurons on a millisecond time scale into sub-micrometer spaces, the development of a glutamate biosensor with high temporal and spatial resolution is of great interest for the study of neurological function and disease. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of an optical glutamate sensor based on the sol-gel encapsulation of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). GDH catalyses the oxidative deamination of glutamate and the reduction of NAD+ to NADH. NADH fluorescence is the basis of the sensor detection. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies show that GDH remains active in the sol-gel matrix and that the reaction rate is correlated to the glutamate concentration.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Kandel, E.R., in Essentials of Neural Science and Behavior, edited by Kandel, E.R., Schwartz, J.H., Jessell, T.M. (Appleton & Lange, Connecticut, 1995), pp. 2139.Google Scholar
2. Westerink, B.H.C., Behav. Brain Res. 70, 103124 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. O'Neill, R.D., Lowry, J.P., Mas, M., Critical Rev. Neurobio. pp.12, 69–127 (1998).Google Scholar
4. Hösing, N., Reisler, E., Zink, J.I., J. Sol-Gel Sci. Tech. 15, pp. 5761 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Sharma, A. and Schulman, S.G., Introduction to Fluorescence Spectroscopy, 1st ed. (John Wiley and Sons, Inc. New York, 1999) p.145.Google Scholar
6. Lehninger, A.L., Nelson, D.L., Cox, M.M., Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd ed. (Worth Publishers, New York, 1993), pp. 212218.Google Scholar
7. Subramanian, S., Biophys. Chem. 7, 375378 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Sol-Gel Optical Sensors for Glutamate
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Sol-Gel Optical Sensors for Glutamate
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Sol-Gel Optical Sensors for Glutamate
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *