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Sol Gel Preparation of Ta2O5 Nanorods Using DNA as Structure Directing Agent

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Humberto A. Monreala
Affiliation:
División de Deterioro de Materiales, Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C.; Miguel de Cervantes # 120 Complejo Industrial Chihuahua. Cd. Chihuahua, Chih. México, C.P. 31109.
Alberto M. Villafañe
Affiliation:
División de Deterioro de Materiales, Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C.; Miguel de Cervantes # 120 Complejo Industrial Chihuahua. Cd. Chihuahua, Chih. México, C.P. 31109.
José G. Chacón
Affiliation:
División de Deterioro de Materiales, Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C.; Miguel de Cervantes # 120 Complejo Industrial Chihuahua. Cd. Chihuahua, Chih. México, C.P. 31109.
Perla E. García
Affiliation:
Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez. Ave. Del Charro # 450 Norte, Cd. Juárez, Chih. México. A.P. 1594-D
Carlos A. Martínez
Affiliation:
Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez. Ave. Del Charro # 450 Norte, Cd. Juárez, Chih. México. A.P. 1594-D
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Abstract

Transition metal oxides are being considered as the next generation materials in field such as electronics and advanced catalysts; between them is Tantalum (V) Oxide; however, there are few reports for the synthesis of this material at the nanometer size which could have unusual properties. Hence, in this work we present the synthesis of Ta2O5 nanorods by sol gel method using DNA as structure directing agent, the size of the nanorods was of the order of 40 to 100 nm in diameter and several microns in length; this easy method can be useful in the preparation of nanomaterials for electronics, biomedical applications as well as catalysts.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

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Sol Gel Preparation of Ta2O5 Nanorods Using DNA as Structure Directing Agent
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