Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-6x4lw Total loading time: 0.202 Render date: 2021-05-10T06:11:56.738Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Silicon Nitride Containing Rare Earth Silicate Intergranular Phases

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Stephen D. Nunn
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087
Terry N. Tiegs
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087
Kristin L. Ploetz
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087
Claudia A. Walls
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087
Nelson Bell
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087
Get access

Abstract

Si3N4 ceramics prepared with refractory grain boundary phases to improve high temperature properties are difficult to densify by conventional sintering methods. Gas-pressure sintering may be used to promote densification and development of acicular grains for improved fracture toughness. The current study examined rare earth silicate sintering aids with the composition M2Si2O7, where M is a trivalent cation (Y, La, Nd). M2O3 and Si02 additions were varied to develop a number of compositions in the Si3N4—Si2N2O—M2Si2O7 ternary phase field. Pressureless sintering and gas-pressure sintering were used to densify the samples. Densification, microstructure development, oxidation resistance, and mechanical properties were evaluated and compared with respect to compositional variations and processing conditions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Carruthers, D. and Lindburg, L., in Ceramic Materials and Components for Engines, edited by Tennery, V. J. (American Ceramic Society, 1988) pp. 12581272.Google Scholar
2. Tsai, R. L. and Raj, R., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 63 [9-10] 513–17 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Knickerbocker, S. H., Zangvil, A., and Brown, S. D., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 68 [4] C99101 (1985).Google Scholar
4. Hirosaki, N., Okada, A., and Mitomo, M., J. Mater. Sci., 25 (1990) 1872–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Hirosaki, N., Okada, A., and Akimune, Y., J. Mater. Sci. Letters, 9 (1990) 1322–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Greskovich, C., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 64 [12] 725–30 (1981).Google Scholar
7. Okada, A. and Hirosaki, N., J. Mater. Sci., 25 (1990) 1656–61.Google Scholar
8. Mitomo, M. and Uenosono, S., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 75 [1] 103108 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Hattori, Y., Tajima, Y., Yabuta, K., Matsuo, J., Kawamura, M., and Watanabe, T., in Ceramic Materials and Components for Engines, edited by Bunk, W. and Hausner, H. (Verlag, FRG, 1986) pp. 165172.Google Scholar
10. Tani, E., Umebayashi, S., Kishi, K., Kobayashi, K., and Nishijima, M., Am. Ceram. Soc. Bull., 65 [9] 1311–15 (1986).Google Scholar
11. Li, C.-W. and Yamanis, J., Ceram. Eng. Sci. Proc., 10 [7-8] 632–45 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Anstis, G. R., Chantikul, P., Lawn, B. R., and Marshall, D. B., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 64 [9] 533–38 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Chantikul, P., Anstis, G. R., Lawn, B. R., and Marshall, D. B., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 64 [9] 539–43 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Mieskowski, D. M. and Sanders, W. A., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 68 [7] C160–C163 (1985).Google Scholar
15. Kishi, K., Umebayashi, S., and Tani, E., J. Mater. Sci., 25 (1990) 2780–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Becher, P. F., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 74 [2] 255–69 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Silicon Nitride Containing Rare Earth Silicate Intergranular Phases
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Silicon Nitride Containing Rare Earth Silicate Intergranular Phases
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Silicon Nitride Containing Rare Earth Silicate Intergranular Phases
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *