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Silicon Carbide Junction Transistors and Schottky Rectifiers optimized for 250°C operation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2014

Siddarth Sundaresan
Affiliation:
GeneSiC Semiconductor, 43670 Trade Center Place, Suite 155, Dulles VA 20166, U.S.A.
Brian Grummel
Affiliation:
GeneSiC Semiconductor, 43670 Trade Center Place, Suite 155, Dulles VA 20166, U.S.A.
Ranbir Singh
Affiliation:
GeneSiC Semiconductor, 43670 Trade Center Place, Suite 155, Dulles VA 20166, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Electrical performance and reliability of SiC Junction Transistors (SJTs) and Schottky rectifiers are presented. The 650 V/50 A-rated SiC SJTs feature current gains (β) up to 110 at room-temperature, 70 at 250°C, and stable breakdown characteristics. Single current pulse measurements indicate an almost invariant β up to 800 A/cm2 at 175°C – a measure of the SOA boundary for pulsed current SJT operation. Lower than 5 mA/cm2 leakage currents are measured on the SJTs at the rated blocking voltage and at 250°C. 1200 V Schottky rectifiers designed for high-temperature operation display < 3 mA/cm2 leakage currents up to 250°C. A 10x reduction in leakage current and 23% reduction in junction capacitance are observed when compared to the nearest competitor. The high-temperature Schottky rectifiers and SJTs display stable breakdown voltages and on-state characteristics after long-term HTRB stressing. A significant improvement in current gain stability is achieved by fine-tuning the fabrication process.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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References

Sundaresan, S., Singh, R., Johnson, R.W., “Silicon Carbide Junction Transistors operating at 500°C”, in proceedings of IMAPS High Temperature Electronics Conference (HiTEC), May 8-10, 2012, Albuquerque, NM, pp. 162166 Google Scholar
Miyake, H. et al. . “4H-SiC BJTs with record current gains of 257 on (0001) and 335 on (000-1), Electron Dev. Lett. 32(7), pp.841843 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sundaresan, S., Soe, A-M, Jeliazkov, S., Singh, R., “Characterization of the stability of the current gain and avalanche mode operation of 4H-SiC BJTs”, IEEE Trans. Electron Dev. 59(10), pp.27952802 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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