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SHG(Second Harmonic Generation) in Reflection from GaAs Surfaces during Sulfur Passivation and Photochemical Washing Processes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Chikashi Yamada
Affiliation:
Optoelectronics Technology Research Laboratory 5-5 Tohkodai, Tsukuba 300-26, Japan
Takahiro Kimura
Affiliation:
Optoelectronics Technology Research Laboratory 5-5 Tohkodai, Tsukuba 300-26, Japan
Peter Fuqua
Affiliation:
Optoelectronics Technology Research Laboratory 5-5 Tohkodai, Tsukuba 300-26, Japan
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Abstract

A passivation processes using Na2S and photochemical washing of GaAs (100) surfaces was studied in real time by a second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique. The intensities of surface-specific SHG signals were compared with those of photoluminescence (PL) signals. We found a remarkable similarity between the SHG and PL intensity changes during these processes. A band-bending model due to Fermi-level pinning at the surface has been applied in order to account for both the SHG and the PL intensity changes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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SHG(Second Harmonic Generation) in Reflection from GaAs Surfaces during Sulfur Passivation and Photochemical Washing Processes
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SHG(Second Harmonic Generation) in Reflection from GaAs Surfaces during Sulfur Passivation and Photochemical Washing Processes
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