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Selective Implantation Patterning and MBE Regrowth for Integration of Mm-Wave Application Heterojunction Devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Hans Brugger
Affiliation:
Daimlerbenz, Research Center, P.O. Box 2360, D-7900 Ulm (Germany)
Claus Wölk
Affiliation:
Daimlerbenz, Research Center, P.O. Box 2360, D-7900 Ulm (Germany)
Harald Müssig
Affiliation:
Daimlerbenz, Research Center, P.O. Box 2360, D-7900 Ulm (Germany)
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Abstract

A technology based on a combination of selective implantation for lateral patterning and a following large area regrowth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is introduced. The technology allows the monolithic integration of devices with different vertical layer sequences on s.i. GaAs substrates in a quasi planar way, e.g. a heterojunction field-effect-transistor (HFET) with a Schottky diode or a MESFET with a Schottky diode. Selective high resistive (>109 Ω/sq) and highly conducting (<20Ω/sq) buried layers are fabricated by high temperature stable oxygen and silicon implantation, respectively. The following MBE regrowth of epitaxial layers yields to an excellent surface morphology. HFET structures with pseudomorphic AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures grown on implanted substrates exhibit a strong photoluminescence response. Carrier densities up to 2.0×1012cm−2 (1.6×1012cm−2) and Hall mobilities of 6150 cm2/Vs (17700 cm2/Vs) at 300 K (80 K) in the dark are achieved. The material quality is drastically improved by substrate preparation and in-situ cleaning prior to MBE regrowth.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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References

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