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Rutherford Backscattering Investigation of the Corrosion of Borosilicate Glass *

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

B. C. Sales
Affiliation:
Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830
L. A. Boatner
Affiliation:
Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830
H. Naramoto
Affiliation:
Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830
C. W. White
Affiliation:
Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830
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Extract

One of the major reservations regarding the use of glass as a primary nuclear waste form is its ability to retain hazardous radioactive nuclei when exposed to ground water at tenmeratures above about 75C. It is now generally accepted that the removal of radioactive nuclei from glass in an aqueous environment proceeds via two main mechanisms, i.e., either by a diffusion process (which may be driven or undriven) or by direct matrix dissolution - which, in its initial phase, also results from a diffusion related process [1]. The term "leaching" is generally employed in describing the overall process resulting in the removal of nuclei (whether they are radioactive or not) from glass that is exposed to an aqueous environment.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1982

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Footnotes

**

Guest scientist from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan.

*

Research sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy under contract W–7405–eng–26 with Union Carbide Corporation.

References

1. Clark, D. E., Pantano, C. G. Jr. and Hench, L. L. in: Corrosion of Glass (Magazines for Industry, Inc., New York 1979).Google Scholar
2. Altenhein, F. K., Lutze, W. and Malow, G. in: Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Vol. 3, Moore, J. G. ed. (Plenum Press, New York 1981) pp. 363370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Feldman, L. C., CRC Reviews in Solid State and Materials Science, May 1981, pp 143167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Chu, W. K., Mayer, J. W., Nicolet, M-A., Buck, T. M., Amsel, G. and Eisen, F., Thin Solid Films 17, 1 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Ziegler, J. F. in He Stopping Powers and Ranges in All Elemental Matter, Vol. 4, (Pergamon Press, New York 1977).Google Scholar
6. Plodinec, M. J. in: Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Vol. 2, Northrup, Clyde J. M. Jr., ed. (Plenum Press, New York 1980) pp. 223229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Karim, D. P., Pronko, P. P., Marcuso, T. L. M., Lam, D. J. and Paulikas, A. P. in: Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Vol. 3, Moore, J. G. ed. (Plenum Press, New York 1981) pp. 397404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Budd, S. M. and Frackiewicz, J., Phys. and Chem. of Glasses 3, 116 (1962).Google Scholar
9. Harvey, K. B. in: Proceedings of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Conference on the Leachability of Radioactive Solids Gatlinburg, Tennessee December 9–12, 1980, p 86.Google Scholar

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