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The Role of Surface Layers in Glass Leaching Performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

J. K. Bates
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439
W. L. Ebert
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439
J. J. Mazer
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439
J. P. Bradley
Affiliation:
McCrone Associates, Inc., 850 Pasquinelli Drive, Westmont, IL 60559
C. R. Bradley
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439
N. L. Dietz
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439
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Abstract

The examination of reacted layers that form as glass reacts can provide insight into reaction mechanisms that control long-term glass reaction, and into processes by which radionuclides are released to solution. Examples are given for the natural glasses obsidian and tektite, and the nuclear waste glasses 131 and 165, where the layers form both in-situ and precipitated from solution, where they are both amorphous and crystal 1ine, where selective incorporation of actinide elements Into stable phases may offer a barrier to release, and where sloughing of the layers from the glass acts as an alternative radionuclide release process to solubility-limited control.Several reaction processes occur simultaneously as glass reacts, and the projection of glass performance to long time periods requires the identification of those processes that dominate the long-term reaction.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1991

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References

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