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Resolving the Control of Magnesium on Calcite Growth: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Consequences of Impurity Incorporation for Biomineral Formation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2011

Kevin J. Davis
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
Patricia M. Dove
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
James J. De Yoreo
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550
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Abstract

Magnesium is a key determinant in CaCO3 biomineral formation and has recently emerged as an important paleotemperature proxy. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic controls of Mg2+ on calcite morphology and growth. Comparison of directly measured monomolecular step velocities (v ) to theoretical crystal growth impurity models demonstrated calcite inhibition due to enhanced mineral solubility through Mg2+ incorporation. Terrace width (λ) measurements independently supported an incorporation mechanism by indicating a shift in the effective supersaturation (σeff) of the growth solutions in the presence of Mg2+. This study resolves the controversy over the molecular-scale mechanism of calcite inhibition by Mg2+ and provides an unambiguous model for the thermodynamic and kinetic consequences of impurity incorporation into CaCO3 biominerals.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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Resolving the Control of Magnesium on Calcite Growth: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Consequences of Impurity Incorporation for Biomineral Formation
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