Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-7zlxw Total loading time: 0.253 Render date: 2022-01-26T07:33:38.811Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

RAMAN μ-SPECTROMETRY, A UNIQUE TOOL FOR ON-SITE ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION OF ANCIENT CERAMICS AND GLASSES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Ph. Colomban*
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Dynamique, Interactions et Réactivité (LADIR), UMR 7075, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique & Université Pierre & Marie Curie, 2 rue Henry-Dunant, 94320 Thiais, France
Get access

Abstract

Raman micro-spectroscopy allows remote, non-destructive analysis of materials. Our laboratory was among the first to apply this technique to frescoes, oil and parchment painting. For five years we have focused our efforts on horn, ivory, tortoise shell and ancient ceramics and glasses. Crystalline and amorphous phases can be identified in both body and surface layer, including the glaze/glass-coloring nanosized pigments (e.g. in lustre ware, the first nano-optic device). Recent generation instruments are portable, which allows for on-site examination, for example, in a museum. In nanostructured, nanocrystalline/amorphous silicate glasses, glazes and most of their pigments, Raman parameters and their multivariable analysis are used to recognize compositions as well as to classify them as a function of their processing. This overview addresses the procedure, choice of the exciting radiation, control of the Raman resonance, data processing and extraction of relevant parameters such as the index of polymerization and different signatures that may be characteristic of specific glazes and pigments. Didactic examples are chosen among pottery that representative of the different production technologies used in the Roman, European (Medici, Meissen, Chantilly, Mennecy, Saint-Cloud, Sèvres), Islamic (Iznik, Kütahya, Safavid) and Asian (Vietnam) worlds.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Colomban, Ph., “Glasses, glazes and ceramics – Recognition of the ancient technology”, Raman Spectroscopy in Archaeology and Art History, ed. Edwards, H.G.M. and Chalmers, J.M. (Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, 2005), 192206.Google Scholar
2. Coupry, C., “Fifteen years of Artifacts Investigations by Raman Spectroscopy“, Raman Spectroscopy in Archaeology and Art History, ed. Edwards, H.G.M. and Chalmers, J.M. (Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, 2005), 207216.Google Scholar
3. Guineau, B., Coupry, C., Gousset, M.T., Forgerit, J.P. and Vezin, J., Scriptorium XL, 157 (1986).Google Scholar
4. Coupry, C. and Groetembril, S., Asian Chemistry Letters 5 171 (2001).Google Scholar
5. Coupry, C., Les pigments utilisés pour l'enluminure à Fécamp aux XIe et XIIe siècles, in Manuscrits et enluminures dans le monde normand (Xe – XVe siècles), Office Universitaire d'Etudes Normandes, Caen (France) 69 (1999).Google Scholar
6. Rassart-Debergh, M. and Coupry, C., Cahiers de la Bibliothèque copte, 12, Etudes coptes VII, 207 (2000).Google Scholar
7. Colomban, Ph., J. Non-Crystalline Solids, 323, 180 (2003).Google Scholar
8. Colomban, Ph., L'Actualité Chimique, février, 12 (2003).Google Scholar
9. Liem, N.Q., Thanh, N.T. and Colomban, Ph., J. Raman Spectr. 33, 287 (2002).Google Scholar
10. Colomban, Ph., Ph., , Milande, V. and Lucas, H., J. Raman Spectr. 35, 68 (2004).Google Scholar
11. Colomban, Ph., Sagon, G. and Faurel, X., J. Raman Spectr. 32, 351 (2001).Google Scholar
12. Colomban, Ph. and Treppoz, F., J. Raman Spectr. 32, 93 (2001).Google Scholar
13. Colomban, Ph., Milande, V., V., and Le Bihan, L., J. Raman Spectr. 35, 68 (2004).Google Scholar
14. Colomban, Ph. and Truong, C., J. Raman Spectr. 35, 195 (2004).Google Scholar
15. Colomban, Ph., J. Raman Spectr. 34, 420 (2003).Google Scholar
16. Faurel, X., Vandeperre, A. and Colomban, Ph., J. Raman Spectr. 34, 290 (2003).Google Scholar
17. Paris, C. and Coupry, C., J. Raman Spectr. 38, 77 (2005).Google Scholar
18. Paris, C., Lecomte, S. and Coupry, C., Applied Spectrosc., (2005).Google Scholar
19. Coupry, C., Sagon, G. and Gorguet-Ballesteros, P., J. Raman Spectr. 28, 85 (1997).Google Scholar
20. Long, D.A., Raman Spectroscopy, (McGraw-Hill International Book Compagny 1977).Google Scholar
21. Colomban, Ph., Spectroscopy Europe 15, 8 (2003).Google Scholar
22. Neff, D., Reguer, S., Bellot-Gurlet, L., Dillmann, Ph. and Bertholon, R., J. Raman Spectr. 35, 739 (2004).Google Scholar
23. Colomban, Ph. and Milande, V., Proc. 1st Worshop on Science, Technology and Cultural Heritage”, 29 June-2nd July 2004, Venice, AIV.Google Scholar
24. Griffith, W. P., “Raman Spectroscopy of Terrestrial Minerals”, ch 12. in Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy of Lunar and Terrestrial Minerals, Karr, C. Jr ed. (Academic Press, New York, 1975).Google Scholar
25. Pinet, M., Smith, D.C. and Lasnier, B., B., , in La Microsonde Raman en Géologie, N° Hors-Série, Revue de Gemmologie, June 1992, Paris, 11.Google Scholar
26. Maestrati, R., Contribution à l'Edification du Catalogue Raman des Gemmes, Diplôme de Gemmologie, University of Nantes, 1989.Google Scholar
27. Colomban, Ph., Robert, I., Roche, C., Sagon, G. and Milande, V., Rev. d'Archéométrie, 28, 153 (2004).Google Scholar
28. Colomban, Ph., Tournié, A. and Bellot-Gurlet, L., J. Raman Spectr. 36, (2005).Google Scholar
29. Colomban, Ph., de Laveaucoupet, R. and Milande, V., J. Raman Spectr. 36, (2005).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

RAMAN μ-SPECTROMETRY, A UNIQUE TOOL FOR ON-SITE ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION OF ANCIENT CERAMICS AND GLASSES
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

RAMAN μ-SPECTROMETRY, A UNIQUE TOOL FOR ON-SITE ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION OF ANCIENT CERAMICS AND GLASSES
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

RAMAN μ-SPECTROMETRY, A UNIQUE TOOL FOR ON-SITE ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION OF ANCIENT CERAMICS AND GLASSES
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *