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Radiolabelling of TiO2 Nanoparticle Libraries for Toxicological Investigations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Anthony W. Musumeci
Affiliation:
a.musumeci@uq.edu.au, The University of Queensland, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Lawrence R Gahan
Affiliation:
gahan@uq.edu.au, The University of Queensland, School of Molecular and Micorbial Sciences, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Tijana Rajh
Affiliation:
rajh@anl.gov, Argonne Nantional Labs, Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne, Illinois, United States
Darren J Martin
Affiliation:
darren.martin@uq.edu.au, The University of Queensland, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Suzanne V Smith
Affiliation:
svs@ansto.gov.au, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Institute for Materials Engineering, Lucas Heights, New South Wales, Australia
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Abstract

To further our understanding of nanoparticle interactions with biological systems, it is important that highly sensitive, reliable and robust methods for labelling particles are established. We report here the application of a series of bi-functional cage ligands to radiolabel a range (i.e. shapes and sizes) of titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles. The cages were covalently attached to the surface of the particles via the use of a dopac derivative and then radiolabelled with a gamma emitting radioisotope. The final radiolabelled nanoparticles proved to be stable in solution and the method easy and robust. The application of a gamma emitter allows the radiolabelled particles to be tracked in vivo and in the environment.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

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Radiolabelling of TiO2 Nanoparticle Libraries for Toxicological Investigations
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