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Radiation Damage Theory: Past, Present and Future

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Alexander V. Barashev
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GH, UK
Stanislav I. Golubov
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831- 6138, USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, East Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750, USA
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Abstract

Efforts of many scientists for more than a half of a century have resulted in substantial understanding of the response of various materials to irradiation. The theory has contributed significantly to this process but has not acquired a status allowing it to play a decisive role in creating radiation-resistant materials. Moreover, some theoretical predictions are in contradiction with observations, which indicates that something important has escaped attention. In the present paper, the current theoretical framework and experimental data are analyzed to elucidate the reasons for such a situation. A way of developing a predictive theory is proposed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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