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Preparation of Vitrified TEM Samples for the Direct Observation of Sol and Gel Structures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Joseph K. Bailey
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Jayesh R. Bellare
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Martha L. Mecartney
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
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Abstract

Direct observation of structure in liquid phase materials is made possible by a cryo-vitrification technique in which a thin liquid sample is frozen at a high cooling rate to prevent crystallization. We have applied this technique to observe the evolution of structure in ceramic sols and gels using TEM. The sample preparation technique is described in detail and results obtained from colloidal and polymeric sols and gels are presented to show the usefulness of the technique. Artifacts arising from radiation damage and beam heating are also discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

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