Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5f95dd588d-qh9vm Total loading time: 0.221 Render date: 2021-10-28T18:59:24.306Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Preparation of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Materials by High Pressure-Thermal Polymerization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Kevin Gaw
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152, Japan
Hironori Suzuki
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152, Japan
Mitsutoshi Jikei
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152, Japan
Yoshio Imai
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152, Japan
Get access

Abstract

Polyimide-silica hybrid materials were prepared via a modified sol-gel, high pressure-thermal polymerization procedure. Precursor monomer salts were made from ethanol soluble 2,5- diethoxycarboxyl terephthalic acid (p-PME) and either a disiloxanediamine, an aliphatic diamine (1,9 diaminononane) or combinations of the two. Solutions of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and monomer salt were transformed into a gel, dehydrated, and the resulting powders were subjected to high pressure and thermal polymerization and transformed into a polyimide-silica composite. By varying the TMOS content, and/or the siloxane to aliphatic diamine ratio., composites of 0 to 100 wt% SiO2 were made. The silica morphology changed significantly with siloxane/aliphatic PI ratio. Reaction mechanisms, thermal and physical properties and composite morphologies are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Wang, B., Hedric, J.C., McGrath, J.E., Macromolecules, 24, 3449 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Morikawa, A., Iyoku, Y., Kakimoto, M., Imai, Y., Poly. J., 24, 107 (1992)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Wai, Y., Yang, D., Tang, L., Hutchins, M.K., J. Mater. Res., 8, 1151 (1993)Google Scholar
4. Schmidt, H., Wolter, H., J. Non-Cryst. Sol., 121, 428 (1990)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Gaw, K., Suzuki, H.,, Kakimoto, M., J. of Photopoly. Sci. and Tech., 8, 2, 144 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Papaspyrides, C.D., Polymer, 31, 490 (1990)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Stoffel, N.C., Kramer, E.J., Wolksen, W., Russell, T.P., Polymer, 34, 21, 4524 (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Colvin, E., Silicon in Organic Synthesis (Butterworths Publ., London, 1981), p. 54 Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Preparation of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Materials by High Pressure-Thermal Polymerization
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Preparation of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Materials by High Pressure-Thermal Polymerization
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Preparation of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Materials by High Pressure-Thermal Polymerization
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *