Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-mgm4h Total loading time: 0.179 Render date: 2021-06-20T08:20:31.451Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Preparation of Nanocrystalline Silicon Quantum Dots by Pulsed Plasma Processes with High Deposition Rates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

K. Nishiguchi
Affiliation:
Research Center for Quantum Effect Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552, JAPAN
S. Hara
Affiliation:
Research Center for Quantum Effect Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552, JAPAN
T. Amano
Affiliation:
Research Center for Quantum Effect Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552, JAPAN
S. Hatatani
Affiliation:
Research Center for Quantum Effect Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552, JAPAN
S. Oda
Affiliation:
Research Center for Quantum Effect Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552, JAPAN
Get access

Abstract

A new method for the fabrication of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) in SiH4 plasma with very-highfrequency (VHF; 144MHz) excitation is proposed to increase the deposition rate, to control the size, and to minimize size dispersion of nc-Si. Nanocrystalline silicon is formed in the gas phase of the SiH4 plasma cell by coalescence of radicals. Supplying Ar enhances the nucleation of nc-Si because of high efficiency of SiH4 excitation into SiH2 radicals resulting in the nucleation. The deposition rate is thus increased by a factor of 100 to 1012/cm2.h. At the low flow rate of SiH4, smaller nc-Si with small dispersion is obtained. Moreover, when pulsed-SiH4 is supplied into Ar plasma, the growth of nuclei is limited by the time when SiH4 flows. The size of nc-Si and its dispersion are adjusted by the duration of SiH4 gas pulse.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Likharev, K.K., IBM J. Res. & Dev. 32, 144 (1988).10.1147/rd.321.0144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Kastner, M. A., Rev. Modem Physics 64, 849 (1992).10.1103/RevModPhys.64.849CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Visscher, E. H., Lindeman, J., Verbrugh, S. M., Hadley, P., Mooij, J. E. and Vleuten, W. van der, Appl. Phys. Lett. 68, 2014 (1996).10.1063/1.115622CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Matsumoto, K., M. Ishii and Segawa, K., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 14, 1331 (1996).10.1116/1.589091CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Yano, K., Ishii, T., Hashimono, T., Kobayashi, T., Murai, E and Seki, K, IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 41,1628 (1994).10.1109/16.310117CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Takahashi, Y, Namatsu, H., Kurihara, K., Iwadate, K, Nagase, M. and Murase, K., IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 43,1213 (1996).10.1109/16.506771CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Otobe, M. and Oda, S., in Amorphous Silicon Technology-1995, edited by Hack, M., Schiff, E. A., Madan, A., Powel, M. and Matsuda, A. (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 377, San Francisco, CA, 1995) pp. 5156.Google Scholar
8. Otobe, M., Kanai, T, Ifuku, T, Yajima, H. and Oda, S., J. Non-Crystalline Solids 198–200, 875 (1996).10.1016/0022-3093(96)00161-5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Itoh, A., Ifuku, T, Otobe, M. and Oda, S., in Advances in Microcrystalline and Nanocrystalline Semiconductors, edited by Collins, R. W., Fauchet, P. M., Shimizu, I., Viel, J. C., Shimada, T, and Alivisatos, A. P, (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 452, Boston, MA, 1996) pp. 749754.Google Scholar
10. Shiratani, M., Matsuo, S. and Watanabe, Y, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30,1887 (1991).10.1143/JJAP.30.1887CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Watanabe, Y and Shiratani, M., Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 3,286 (1994).10.1088/0963-0252/3/3/008CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Kono, A., Koike, N., Okuda, K. and Goto, T., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 32, L543 (1993).10.1143/JJAP.32.L543CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Volmer, M. and Weber, A., Z. Phys. Chem. 119, 277 (1926).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Preparation of Nanocrystalline Silicon Quantum Dots by Pulsed Plasma Processes with High Deposition Rates
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Preparation of Nanocrystalline Silicon Quantum Dots by Pulsed Plasma Processes with High Deposition Rates
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Preparation of Nanocrystalline Silicon Quantum Dots by Pulsed Plasma Processes with High Deposition Rates
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *