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Preferential Etching of Si(111) and Si(001) in Dilute NH4F Solutions: as Probed by In Situ STM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Kingo Itaya
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 982, Japan
Shueh-Lin Yau
Affiliation:
Itaya Electrochemiscopy Project, JRDC/ERATO, Yagiyama-minami 2-1-1, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982, Japan
Kazutoshi Kaji
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 982, Japan
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Abstract

In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to examine the etching process of n-Si(11) and Si(001) electrodes in dilute NH4F under cathodic potential control. For Si(111), time-dependent STM images have revealed the pronounced effect of the microscopic structure of surface Si atoms on their dissolution rates. The multiple hydrogen bonded Si atoms at the kink sites and dihydride steps eroded faster than the monohydride terminated Si. Presumably, the higher polarity at these defect sites is responsible for the difference. Steric consideration further favors the higher activity at the more open kink sites. The monohydride terminated Si(111) surface represents the most stable surface structure, which guides the dissolution of the Si(001) surface to the formation of {111} facets. The initial stage {111} facet formation on a Si(001) surface was revealed by in situ STM.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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Preferential Etching of Si(111) and Si(001) in Dilute NH4F Solutions: as Probed by In Situ STM
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Preferential Etching of Si(111) and Si(001) in Dilute NH4F Solutions: as Probed by In Situ STM
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