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Post Annealing Studies of C60 Ion Implanted Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Nethaji Dharmarasu
Affiliation:
TOYOTA TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, 2-12-1 HISAKATA, TEMPAKU, NAGOYA 468- 8511, JAPAN
Kannan L. Narayanan
Affiliation:
TOYOTA TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, 2-12-1 HISAKATA, TEMPAKU, NAGOYA 468- 8511, JAPAN
Nabuaki Kojima
Affiliation:
TOYOTA TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, 2-12-1 HISAKATA, TEMPAKU, NAGOYA 468- 8511, JAPAN
Yoshio Ohshita
Affiliation:
TOYOTA TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, 2-12-1 HISAKATA, TEMPAKU, NAGOYA 468- 8511, JAPAN
Masafumi Yamaguchi
Affiliation:
TOYOTA TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, 2-12-1 HISAKATA, TEMPAKU, NAGOYA 468- 8511, JAPAN
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Abstract

Physical properties of multiple-energy B-ion implanted C60 thin films were investigated for various doses. Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicate the structural transformation of C60 to amorphous carbon phase during implantation. The conductivity type of the implanted films is found to be p-type and the conductivity measurements reveal a dramatic increase in the conductivity with ion implantation. Temperature dependent conductivity shows the semiconducting nature of the B-ion implanted films. The optical absorption coefficient and optical gap of the implanted films have been observed as a function of B-ion dose. Measurements on implanted films subjected to thermal annealing indicate the removal of the defects caused during the implantation. Ion implantation-induced defects are found to partially annihilate with the annealing temperature. Electrical conductivity and optical gap are determined in the post-implanted films. The observation of the systematic increase in the conductivity of the annealed films is due to the removal of the defects and the formation of defect free boron impurity acceptor.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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