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Polyethylene Oxide Nanofibers as Ultraviolet Sensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Saima Naz Khan
Affiliation:
saima@phy.ohiou.edu, Ohio University, Chemistry and Bio-Chemistry, 158 Clippinger labs, Athens, OH, 45701, United States
Jeffrey J. Rack
Affiliation:
ak1175.2@gmail.com, Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 251B Clippinger labs, Athens, OH, 45701, United States
Aaron R. Rachford
Affiliation:
Ohio University, Chemistry and Bio-Chemistry, 158 Clippinger labs, Athens, OH, 45701, United States
Martin E. Kordesch
Affiliation:
kordesch@phy.ohiou.edu, Ohio University, Physics and Astronomy, 251B Clippinger labs, Athens, OH, 45701, United States
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Abstract

Using the electrospinning technique, we have prepared [Ru (pic) 2 (dmso) 2] doped-polyethylene oxide nanofibers for ultraviolet sensing. The diameter of the as-prepared fibers is in the range of 1μm-100nm. These fibers change color from pale yellow to orange when exposed to ultraviolet light (wavelength∼350nm) and return to their original color after approximately 2-3 days. The intensity of the color increases with an increased time of exposure to UV. The color changing behavior in the nanofibrous mat is almost the same as that in cast films prepared from the same solutions. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of the fibers show that the morphology of the fibers remains unchanged after exposure to UV.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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