Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-wdwc2 Total loading time: 0.242 Render date: 2022-01-22T19:11:49.215Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Piezoelectric Multimaterial Fibers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2011

Noémie Chocat
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Zheng Wang
Affiliation:
Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A. Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Shunji Egusa
Affiliation:
Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Zachary M. Ruff
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Alexander M. Stolyarov
Affiliation:
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Dana Shemuly
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Fabien Sorin
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A. Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Peter T. Rakich
Affiliation:
Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
John D. Joannopoulos
Affiliation:
Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A. Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Yoel Fink
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A. Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
Get access

Abstract

Here we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of fiber containing an internal crystalline non-centrosymmetric phase enabling piezoelectric functionality over extended fiber lengths [1]. A ferroelectric polymer layer of 30 μm thickness is spatially confined and electrically contacted by internal viscous electrodes and encapsulated in an insulating polymer cladding hundreds of microns in diameter. The structure is thermally drawn in its entirety from a macroscopic preform, yielding tens of meters of piezoelectric fiber. Electric fields in excess of 50V/μm are applied through the internal electrodes to the ferroelectric layer leading to effective poling of the structure. To unequivocally establish that the internal copolymer layer is macroscopically poled we adopt a two-step approach. First, we show that the internal piezoelectric modulation indeed translates to a motion of the fiber’s surface using a heterodyne optical vibrometer at kHz frequencies. Second, we proceed to an acoustic wave measurement at MHz frequencies: a water-immersion ultrasonic transducer is coupled to a fiber sample across a water tank, and frequency-domain characterizations are carried out using the fiber successively as an acoustic sensor and actuator. These measurements establish the broadband piezoelectric response and acoustic transduction capability of the fiber. The potential to modulate sophisticated optical devices is illustrated by constructing a single-fiber electricallydriven device containing a high-quality-factor Fabry-Perot optical resonator and a piezoelectric transducer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Egusa, S., Wang, Z., Chocat, N., Ruff, Z.M., Stolyarov, A.M., Shemuly, D., Sorin, F., Rakich, P.T., Joannopoulos, J.D., & Fink, Y., Nature Materials 9 (8), 643-648 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Abouraddy, A.F., Bayindir, M., Benoit, G., Hart, S.D., Kuriki, K., Orf, N., Shapira, O., Sorin, F., Temelkuran, B., & Fink, Y., Nature Materials 6 (5), 336-347 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Larsen, T.T., Bjarklev, A., Hermann, D.S., & Broeng, J., Optics Express 11 (20), 2589-2596 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Benoit, G., Kuriki, K., Viens, J.F., Joannopoulos, J.D., & Fink, Y., Optics Letters 30 (13), 1620-1622 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Kerbage, C., Hale, A., Yablon, A., Windeler, R.S., & Eggleton, B.J., Applied Physics Letters 79 (19), 3191-3193 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Bergot, M.V., Farries, M.C., Fermann, M.E., Li, L., Poyntzwright, L.J., Russell, P.S.J., & Smithson, A., Optics Letters 13 (7), 592-594 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Townsend, P.D., Poustie, A.J., Hardman, P.J., & Blow, K.J., Optics Letters 21 (5), 333-335 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Fokine, M., Nilsson, L.E., Claesson, A., Berlemont, D., Kjellberg, L., Krummenacher, L., & Margulis, W., Optics Letters 27 (18), 1643-1645 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Carpi, F., & De Rossi, D., Ieee Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine 9 (3), 295-318 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Matsushige, K., Nagata, K., Imada, S., & Takemura, T., Polymer 21 (12), 1391-1397 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Yagi, T., Tatemoto, M., & Sako, J., Polymer Journal 12 (4), 209-223 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Piezoelectric Multimaterial Fibers
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Piezoelectric Multimaterial Fibers
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Piezoelectric Multimaterial Fibers
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *