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Physical Property Characteristics of Pitch Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

David P. Anderson
Affiliation:
University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park Avenue, Dayton, OH 45469-0168
Philip G. Wapner
Affiliation:
University of Dayton Research Institute, Phillips Lab, Edwards AFB, CA
David B. Curliss
Affiliation:
Wright Laboratory, WL/MLBC Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-6533
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Abstract

The two most important material properties for foam process modeling are liquid viscosity and surface tension. Several different pitches were examined including Ashland petroleum pitches and a synthetic mesophase pitch (Mitsubishi AR). Viscosities of isotropic pitch were measured at various temperatures above their softening points using an oscillating disk rheometer and found to be independent of shear rate and closely match the manufacturer's data. Only a very weak dependence of surface tension on temperature was found from calculations made from pendent drop measurements. The density of these materials, which was needed for the surface tension calculations, was measured using an elevated temperature mercury dilatometer. Transitions indicated by the volumetric results were also investigated by DSC.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

1. Metha, R., Hager, J. W., and Anderson, D. P., presented at 1991 AICHE national meeting, Los Angeles, CA (1991) (unpublished).Google Scholar
2. Metha, R., Hager, J. W., Anderson, D. P., and Gunnison, K. E., presented at the 1992 MRS meeting, San Francisco, CA (1992) (in press).Google Scholar
3. Ashland Petroleum Aerocarb technical bulletin (1992).Google Scholar
4. Curliss, D. B. and Russell, J. D., 37th International. SAMPE Symp. 620 (1992).Google Scholar
5. Wapner, P. G. and Hager, J. W., Proc. 15th Conf. on Metal Matrix, Carbon, and Ceramic Matrix Composites, 13 (1991)Google Scholar
6. Wapner, P. G. and Hager, J. W., Proc. Am. Carbon Soc. Conf., 20, 188 (1991).Google Scholar
7. Wapner, P. G. and Tlomak, P., Proc. 16th Conf. on Metal Matrix, Carbon, and Ceramic Matrix Composites, (1992) (in press).Google Scholar

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