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Photonic coupled systems between on-chip integrated microresonator and core-shell nanoparticle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 January 2015

Y. Xiong
Affiliation:
Universityof Michigan, MI
P. Pignalosa
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
Y. Yi*
Affiliation:
Universityof Michigan, MI Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
*
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Abstract

We have numerically investigated the unique effects of the core-shell nanoparticles on the integrated micro disk resonator. By attaching the core-shell nanoparticle to the disk resonator with gold core and polymer shell, the coupling between the disk resonator and the core-shell nanoparticle results in shift of the resonance wavelength of the disk resonator, depending on the core size/shell thickness of the nanoparticle. An ‘invisibility’ phenomenon found from the coupled core-shell nanoparticle and integrated disk resonator system is emphasized: at certain core size/shell thickness ratio, compared to the original resonance wavelength without core-shell nanoparticle, there is almost no resonance wavelength shift observed. The dependence of the position and number of core-shell nanoparticles is also discussed. Future studies on this coupled photonic systems will stimulate wide variety of applications.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

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