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Overheating In Silicon During Pulsed-Laser Irradiation?*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

B. C. Larson
Affiliation:
Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831
J. Z. Tischler
Affiliation:
Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831
D. M. Mills
Affiliation:
CHESS and Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853
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Abstract

Nanosecond resolution time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of thermal strain have been used to measure the interface temperatures in silicon during pulsed-laser irradiation. The pulsed-time-structure of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) was used to measure the temperature of the liquid-solid interface of <111> silicon during melting with an interface velocity of 11 m/s, at a time of near zero velocity, and at a regrowth velocity of 6 m/s. The results of these measurements indicate 110 K difference between the temperature of the interface during melting and regrowth, and the measurement at zero velocity shows that most of the difference is associated with undercooling during the regrowth phase.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1985

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Footnotes

*

Research sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.

References

[1] Cahn, J. W., Coriell, S. R., and Boettinger, W. L., p. 89 in Laser and Electron Beam Processing of Materials, ed. by White, C. W. and Peercy, P. S., Academic Press, NY (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[2] Cullis, A. G., p. 16 in Energy Beam-Solid Interactions and Transient Thermal Processing 1984, ed. by Biegelsen, D. K., Rozgonyi, G. A., and Shank, C. V. (Materials Research Society, 1985).Google Scholar
[3] Larson, B. C., Tischler, J. Z., and Mills, D. M., p. 187 (same as Ref. 2).Google Scholar
[4] Larson, B. C., White, C. W., Noggle, T. S., Barhorst, J. F., and Mills, D. M., Appl. Phys. Lett. 42, 282 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[5] Thompson, M. O., private communication (see Ref. 8).Google Scholar
[6] Larson, B. C., Tischler, J. Z., and Mills, D. M., J. Mat. Res. (in press).Google Scholar
[7] Galvin, G. J., Mayer, J. W., and Peercy, P. S., Appl. Phys. Lett. 46, 644 (1985); P. S. Peercy and M. O. Thompson, p. 54 in Energy Beam-Solid Interactions and Transient Thermal Processing 1984, ed. by D. K. Biegelsen, G. A. Rozgonyi, C. V. Shank (Materials Research Society, Pittsburgh, PA, 1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[8] Thompson, M. O., Bucksbaum, P. H., and Bokor, J., p. 181 in Energy Beam-Solid Interactions and Transient Thermal Processing 1984, ed. by Biegelsen, D. K., Rozgonyi, G. A., and Shank, C. V. (Materials Research Society, Pittsburgh, PA, 1985).Google Scholar

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