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Origin and Elimination of Scattering Losses in Fluoride Glasses and Fiber

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

J. S. Sanghera
Affiliation:
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia
I. Aggarwal
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375
B. Harbisp
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375
L. Busse
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375
P. Pureza
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375
P. Hart
Affiliation:
Sachs/Freeman Assocs., Inc., Landover, MD 20875
M. G. Sachon
Affiliation:
Sachs/Freeman Assocs., Inc., Landover, MD 20875
L. Sills
Affiliation:
Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD 20744
R. Miklos
Affiliation:
Sachs/Freeman Assocs., Inc., Landover, MD 20875
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Abstract

The sources of scattering losses in fluorozirconate glasses and fibers are reviewed. Results are presented which show that the predominant mechanism responsible for the presence of fluoride crystals is heterogeneous nucleation. The nature and origin of the different nuclei are discussed and possible ways to eliminate them from the glasses assessed. It is proposed that extreme care be employed in the processing of the glasses with particular emphasis on the preform fabrication step as this is critical to the design of ultra-low loss fibers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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