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Orientation Imaging of the Microstructure of Polycrystalline Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Brent L. Adams
Affiliation:
Brigham Young University, Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Provo, Utah 84602
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Abstract

Recent developments, coupling the scanning electron microscope with image processing and crystallographic analysis, now make it possible to automatically index many thousands of lattice orientations exposed on section planes in polycrystalline materials. Backscattered Kikuchi diffraction patterns obtained from high-gain SIT and CCD cameras are analyzed using the Hough transformation (Cartesian coordinates - polar coordinates) in order to identify diffraction band widths and interplanar angles. From this basic information local lattice orientation can be determined. Information from raw data sets (in excess of 100,000 single orientations in some examples) can be used to construct orientation imaging micrographs which emphasize certain aspects of the exposed field of lattice orientations. Thus, features of the spatial placement of lattice orientation (including grain boundary misorientation, microtexture, and connectivity of the microstructure) are readily studied. In this paper these techniques are reviewed, and recent explorations of the connectivity of grain boundary misorientation structure are presented for an interesting nickel-chromium-iron alloy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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