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Optical and Nanomechanical Characterization of an Omnidirectional Reflector Encompassing 850 nm Wavelength

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Manish Deopura
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA 02139
Yoel Fink
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA 02139
Christopher A. Schuh
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA 02139
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Abstract

We demonstrate that multilayers composed of nineteen alternating layers of tin sulfide and silica can function as omnidirectional reflectors. These materials exhibit omnidirectional reflectivity for a range of frequencies in the near infra-red (NIR) encompassing the 850 nm wavelength. A refractive index contrast of 2.7/1.46 is achieved, one of the highest values demonstrated until now in NIR photonic bad gaps. In addition, new nanoindentation procedures have been developed to measure mechanical properties of these fine laminate materials, and demonstrate that tin sulfide-silica multilayers are mechanically stable for practical applications.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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References

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