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On the Ohmic Contact Formation Mechanism in the Au/Te/N-GaAs System

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

K. Wuyts
Affiliation:
Physics Department, K.U.Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3030 Leuven, Belgium
G. Langouche
Affiliation:
Physics Department, K.U.Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3030 Leuven, Belgium
H. Vanderstraeten
Affiliation:
Physics Department, K.U.Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3030 Leuven, Belgium
R.E. Silverans
Affiliation:
Physics Department, K.U.Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3030 Leuven, Belgium
M. Van Hove
Affiliation:
Imec, Kapeldreef 75, B–3030 Leuven, Belgium
M. Van Rossum
Affiliation:
Imec, Kapeldreef 75, B–3030 Leuven, Belgium
H. Münder
Affiliation:
ISI, KFA Jülich, D–5170 Jülich, Germany
H. Lüth
Affiliation:
ISI, KFA Jülich, D–5170 Jülich, Germany
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Abstract

Alloyed Au/Te/n–GaAs ohmic contacts, with contact resistivities comparable to those of the AuGe device standard, have been developed and studied by Mässbauer spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-Ray Diffraction. The formation of Au-doped Ga2Te3 crystallites, grown epitaxially on a defectively GaAs surface was observed. No evidence for the formation of an n++–GaAs surface layer could be derived. The interpretation of all experimental results leads to a description of the ohmic conduction mechanism based on a resonant tunneling process assisted by defect/impurity related deep levels through low barrier metal/Te/(Au)Ga2Te3/GaAs interfaces

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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