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Numerical Modeling and Experimental Measurements of Pulsed Ion Beam Surface Treatment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Michael O. Thompson
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853
T. J. Renk
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Dept 9521, Albuquerque, NM, 87185
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Abstract

Pulsed ion beam treatment of materials provides an attractive alternative to pulsed laser processing for near surface modification of semiconductors, metals and polymers. The transfer of energy to the sample occurs by electronic and nuclear stopping over depths extending to several microns depending on ion species and voltage. A numerical code for modeling the melt and solidification behavior of materials under ion beam processing has been developed. The code and parameter extraction procedures were validated experimentally by comparing simulations with experimental measurements of the melt duration in silicon. The sensitivity of the melt behavior to variations in the beam properties was also investigated. The quiescent nature of the melt was confirmed by measurements of the diffusion of arsenic in the melt. These results demonstrate that simulations of the ion beam treatment can quantitatively match experimental results with no adjustable parameters.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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References

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Numerical Modeling and Experimental Measurements of Pulsed Ion Beam Surface Treatment
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