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Novel three Dimensional Biodegradable Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Kacey G. Marra
Affiliation:
Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Pittsburgh, PA
Phil G. Campbell
Affiliation:
Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Pittsburgh, PA
Paul A. Dimilla
Affiliation:
Chemical Engineering Dept., CMU
Prashant N. Kumta
Affiliation:
Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Pittsburgh, PA Materials Science and Eng. Dept, CMU
Mark P. Mooney
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Anatomy & Histology, Pittsburgh, PA
Jeffrey W. Szem
Affiliation:
Div. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
Lee E. Weiss
Affiliation:
Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Pittsburgh, PA Robotics Institute, CMU
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Abstract

We have constructed osteogenic scaffolds using solid freeform fabrication techniques. Blends of biodegradable polymers, polycaprolactone and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), have been examined as scaffolds for applications in bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite granules were incorporated into the blends and porous discs were prepared. Mechanical properties and degradation rates of the composites were determined. The discs were seeded with rabbit bone marrow or cultured bone marrow stromal cells and in vitro studies were conducted. Electron microscopy and histological analysis revealed an osteogenic composite that supports bone cell growth not only on the surface but throughout the 1 mm thick scaffold as well. Seeded and unseeded discs were mechanically assembled in layers and implanted in a rabbit rectus abdominis muscle. Bone growth was evident after eight weeks in vivo. Electron microscopy and histological analyses indicate vascularization and primitive bone formation throughout the seeded composite, and also a “fusion” of the layers to form a single, solid construct. Finally, we have begun to incorporate the growth factor IGF-I into the scaffold to enhance osteogenicity and/or as an alternative to cell seeding.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

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