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A novel fabrication technique by composite material processing: Integrated metal-insulator-semiconductor fibers and fiber devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Mehmet Bayindir
Affiliation:
mehmet@mit.edu, MIT, Research Laboratory of Electronics, 50 Vassar Street, Room: 36-229, Cambridge, MA, 02139, United States
Ayman F. Abouraddy
Affiliation:
raddy@mit.edu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics, United States
Ofer Shapira
Affiliation:
ofers@mit.edu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics, United States
Jeff Viens
Affiliation:
jfviens@mit.edu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics
John D. Joannopoulos
Affiliation:
joannop@MIT.EDU, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics
Yoel Fink
Affiliation:
yoel@mit.edu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics
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Abstract

Fabrication of functional devices in fibers by thermal drawing requires a material identification scheme and challenging composite material processing. A macroscopic preform rod containing metallic, semiconducting and insulating constituents in a variety of geometries and close contact leads to kilometer-long novel optoelectronic, and thermal mesoscopic fiber devices. The preform-to-fiber approach yields spectrally tunable photodetectors and integrated self-monitoring fibers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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References

1. Bayindir, M., et al. , Metal-insulator-semiconductor optoelectronic fibres, Nature 431, 826 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2. Bayindir, M., et al. , Fiber photodetectors codrawn from conducting, semiconducting, and insulating materials, Opt. and Photon. News 15, 24 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Bayindir, M., et al. , Integrated fibres for self-monitored optical transport, Nature Materials 4, 820 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Bayindir, M., et al. , Thermal-sensing mesoscopic fiber devices by composite-material processing, submitted to Advanced Materials (2005).Google Scholar
5. Harrington, J. A., Infrared Fibers and Their Applications (SPIE Press, 2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Devaiah, A. K, et al. , Surgical utility of a new carbon dioxide laser fiber: Functional and histological study, Laryngoscope 115, 1463 (2005).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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8. Temelkuran, B., Hart, S. D., et al. , Wavelength-scalable hollow optical fibres with large photonic bandgaps for CO2 laser transmission, Nature 420, 650 (2002).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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A novel fabrication technique by composite material processing: Integrated metal-insulator-semiconductor fibers and fiber devices
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