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New Chemical Approaches to Synthesize Titanium Disulfide

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Mandyam A. Sriram
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Prashant N. Kumta
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213
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Abstract

The synthesis of oxides by the use of metal alkoxides is well known in the sol-gel process. However, little is known regarding the use of alkoxides as starting materials for nonoxides. In this work titanium isopropoxide has been reacted with different sulfidizing agents to form alkoxy sulfide precursors. In all the processes the transformation of the precursors to form TiS2 has been studied and the morphologies of the sulfide powders have also been compared. Gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy have been used to study the molecular processes that occur in one of the reactions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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