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Nanoscale Control of the Polymer-Fullerene Interface in Photovoltaic Devices by Thermally-Controlled Interdiffusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

M. Drees
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
R.M. Davis
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0211
D. Marciu
Affiliation:
Luna Innovations, Inc., P.O. Box 11704, Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
K. Premaratne
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
W. Graupner
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
M. Miller
Affiliation:
Luna Innovations, Inc., P.O. Box 11704, Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
J.R. Heflin
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
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Abstract

Ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer from conjugated polymers to fullerenes has led to extensive studies of these systems as photovoltaic devices. The charge transfer process prevents radiative electron-hole recombination, resulting in free, mobile charges. A limiting factor is the exciton diffusion distance, which is of the order of 10 nm. If the fullerene is not within this distance of the optical excitation site, no charge separation will take place. The simplest system for such devices is a bilayer system in which a film of C60 is sublimed onto a spin-cast film of MEH-PPV, for example. We describe studies in which the polymer is heated above the glass transition temperature in an inert environment, inducing an interdiffusion of the polymer and the fullerene layers. With this process, a controlled, bulk, gradient heterojunction is created. The photoluminescence and the short circuit currents of the devices show a dramatic decrease in photoluminescence and concomitant increase in short circuit currents, demonstrating the improved interface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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References

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Nanoscale Control of the Polymer-Fullerene Interface in Photovoltaic Devices by Thermally-Controlled Interdiffusion
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Nanoscale Control of the Polymer-Fullerene Interface in Photovoltaic Devices by Thermally-Controlled Interdiffusion
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