Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-pc5cw Total loading time: 0.2 Render date: 2021-09-28T05:58:52.589Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Nanoscale Analysis of Defects in Semiconductors and Dielectrics by Means of Charge-transient Spectroscopy/microscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Štefan Lányi
Affiliation:
lanyi@savba.sk, Institute of Physics, SAS, Solid State Physics, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava, SK-845 11, Slovakia, +421259410525, +421254776085
Vojtech Nádaždy
Affiliation:
fyzinavo@savba.sk, Institute of Physics, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, Bratislava, SK-845 11, Slovakia
Miloslav Hruškovic
Affiliation:
miloslav.hruskovic@stuba.sk, Slovak University of Technology, Faculty od Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Ilkovicova 3, Bratislava, SK-812 19, Slovakia
Ján Hribik
Affiliation:
jan.hribik@stuba.sk, Slovak University of Technology, Faculty od Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Ilkovicova 3, Bratislava, SK-812 19, Slovakia
Get access

Abstract

We discuss the possibilities of analysis of electrically active defects in semiconductors and dielectrics by means of Isothermal Capacitance-Transient Spectroscopy and Isothermal Charge-Transient Spectroscopy, applied on sub-micrometer scale. While the first of them utilizes the relaxation of the depletion layer, caused by emission of trapped charges and requires sufficient conductivity, the second directly integrates the transient current and can be applied also to low-conductivity materials like dielectrics.

We present some results obtained on pentacene thin films. By means of our charge-transient spectrometer we have achieved a resolution of hundreds of electrons but we believe it can be further improved approximately by one order of magnitude. In materials with relatively high defect concentration, using optimal shape of the probe, a resolution on the order of tens of manometers can be achieved. At low defect concentrations, e.g. in device quality silicon, a resolution on the hundred-nm level is expected.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Lang, D.V., J. Appl. Phys. 45, 3023 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Kirov, K.I., Radev, K.B., Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 63, 711 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Ferenczi, G., Boda, J. and Pavelka, T., Phys. Stat. Solidi (a) 94, K119 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Exarchos, M., Dieudonne, F., Jomaah, J., Papaioannou, G.J. and Balestra, F., Microelectron. Reliab. 44, 1643 (2004).Google Scholar
5. Kolev, P.V. and Deen, M.J., J. Appl. Phys. 83, 820 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Williams, C. C., Ann. Rev. Mater. Sci., 29, 471 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Sze, S. M., Physics of Semiconductor Devices, Wiley-Interscience, New York 1969.Google Scholar
8. Tóth, A.L., Dózsa, L., Gyulai, J., Giannazzo, F. and Rainieri, V., Mat. Sci. Semicond. Process. 4, 89 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Kim, C. K., Yoon, I. T., Kuk, Y. and Lim, H., Appl. Phys. Lett., 78, 613 (2001).Google Scholar
10. Lányi, Š., Acta Phys. Slovaca, 52, 55 (2002).Google Scholar
11. Lee, D. T., Pelz, J. P. and Bhushan, B., Rev. Sci. Instrum., 73, 3525 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Nádaždy, V., Rana, V., Ishihara, R., Lányi, Š., Durný, R., Metselaar, J.W. and Beenakker, C.I.M., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., 910, 0910–A19, Materials Research Society 2006,Google Scholar
13. Lányi, Š. and Nádaždy, V., Ultramicroscopy, 107, 963 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Lányi, Š., Nádaždy, V., Hruškovic, M. and Hribik, J., presented at 2007 E-MRS Fall Meating, Warsaw, 2007.Google Scholar
15. Lányi, Š., Török, J. and Řehůřek, P., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 2258 (1994).Google Scholar
16. Lányi, Š., Ultramicroscopy 103, 221 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Thurzo, I.. Gmucová, K., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 2244 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Lányi, Š., Meas. Sci. Technol. 12, 1456 (2001).Google Scholar
19. Horowitz, P. and Hill, W., The Art of Electronics, Cambridge University Press 1985.Google Scholar
20. Yang, Yong Suk et al. , Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 1595 (2002).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Nanoscale Analysis of Defects in Semiconductors and Dielectrics by Means of Charge-transient Spectroscopy/microscopy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Nanoscale Analysis of Defects in Semiconductors and Dielectrics by Means of Charge-transient Spectroscopy/microscopy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Nanoscale Analysis of Defects in Semiconductors and Dielectrics by Means of Charge-transient Spectroscopy/microscopy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *