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Nanocones- a different form of carbon with unique properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Henning Heiberg-Andersen
Affiliation:
henning.heiberg-andersen@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Instituttveien 18, Kjeller, Norway, N-20227, Norway, +47 63 80 60 81
Geir Helgesen
Affiliation:
geir.helgesen@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Norway
Kenneth Knudsen
Affiliation:
knudsen@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Norway
Jean Patrick Pinheiro
Affiliation:
jean.patrick.pinheiro@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Norway
Eldrid Svåsand
Affiliation:
eldrid.svaasand@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Norway
Arne Skjeltorp
Affiliation:
arne.skjeltorp@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Norway
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Abstract

It is possible to make perfect conical carbon nanostructures fundamentally different from the other nanocarbon materials, notably buckyballs and nanotubes. Carbon cones are realized in five distinctly different forms. They consist of curved graphite sheets formed as open cones with one to five carbon pentagons at the tip with successively smaller cone angles, respectively. The nucleation and physics of nanocones has been relatively little explored until now. We present here the key facts and latest results on this “5’th form of carbon”.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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