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Morphology and Texture of Chemical-Vapour-Deposited TiN Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Noboru Yoshikawa
Affiliation:
Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai Japan 98077, yoshin@material.tohoku.ac.jp
Shoji Taniguchi
Affiliation:
Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai Japan 98077, yoshin@material.tohoku.ac.jp
Atsushi Kikuchi
Affiliation:
Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai Japan 98077, yoshin@material.tohoku.ac.jp
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Abstract

TiN films were obtained by Chemical Vapour Depositon (CVD) under different deposition conditions. Their grain structure, morphology and preferred crystal orientation were investigated. It was observed that well-defined columnar grams developed under conditions of atmospheric thermal CVD, giving rise to strong preferred orientations. In this study, grain structures of CVD-TiN films were classified with respect to the substrate temperature. Films of zone I structure were obtained at 1173K (0.35Tm), and those of zone II were obtained at 1223K (0.38Tm). Crystal shape of the zone II columnar grains was influenced by the partial pressure of TiCl4 (PTiCl4 ), and the crystal orientation of films was related to the crystal shapes. Columnar grains increased their thickness during deposition process under conditions of low PTiC14 and high temperature (>1250K). The increase rate of grain size had a similar time dependence to that of normal grain growth. The “quadrangular-shaped” and “star-shaped” columnar crystals were formed. They consisted of several crystals and contained twins. Their microstructures were observed in relation to their crystallographic features.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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