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Moisture and Purity in Polyimide Coatings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

A. J. Beuhler
Affiliation:
Amoco Chemical Company, P. O. Box 400, Naperville, IL 60566
M. J. Burgess
Affiliation:
Amoco Chemical Company, P. O. Box 400, Naperville, IL 60566
D. E. Fjare
Affiliation:
Amoco Chemical Company, P. O. Box 400, Naperville, IL 60566
J. M. Gaudette
Affiliation:
Amoco Chemical Company, P. O. Box 400, Naperville, IL 60566
R. T. Roginski
Affiliation:
Amoco Chemical Company, P. O. Box 400, Naperville, IL 60566
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Extract

Moisture and ionic impurities play a major role in the failure mechanism of integrated devices. [1] The use of organic polymers as microelectronic coatings offers advantages in improved planarization of metal steps, low temperature processibility, and reduction of mechanical stresses. [2] Cited disadvantages are the high inherent moisture absorption and level of impurities. Polymers introduce levels of moisture and impurities 10–100 times greater than vacuum deposited inorganic insulators.[3] Moreover, the combination of ionic impurities and a high humidity environment will degrade attractive polymer properties such as high resistivity and low dielectric constant. [4]

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1989

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References

1. Senturia, S.D., Miller, R.A., Denton, D.D., Recent Advances in Polymer Science and Technology, edited by Webber, W.D., Society of Plastics Engineers, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., p.351361.Google Scholar
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3. Pliskin, W.A., Gdula, R.A., Handbook on Semiconductors, edited by Moss, T.S., North-Holland 1980, p. 664.Google Scholar
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12. Neuhaus, H.J., Day, D.R., Senturia, S.D., J. Electronic Materials, 14, 379 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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14. Bondi, A., Physical Properties of Molecular Crystals, Liquids, and Gases, John Wiley & Sons, New York, N.Y. 1968.Google Scholar
15. Communication with Senturia, S., May 1989.Google Scholar

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