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Modeling of Polishing Regimes in Chemical Mechanical Polishing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Suresh B. Yeruva
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering Particle Engineering Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, U.S.A>
Chang-Won Park
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering Particle Engineering Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, U.S.A>
Brij M. Moudgil
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering Particle Engineering Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, U.S.A>
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Abstract

Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is widely used for local and global planarization of microelectronic devices. It has been demonstrated experimentally in the literature that the polishing performance is a result of the synergistic effect of both the chemicals and the particles involved in CMP. However, the fundamental mechanisms of material removal and the interactions of the chemical and mechanical effects are not well understood. A comprehensive model for CMP was developed taking into account both the chemical and mechanical effects for monodisperse slurries. The chemical aspect is attributed to the chemical modification of the surface layer due to slurry chemistry, whereas the mechanical aspect is introduced by indentation of particles into the modified layer and the substrate depending on the operating conditions. In this study, the model is extended to include the particle size and pad asperity distribution effects. The refined model not only predicts the overall removal rate but also the surface roughness of the polished wafer, which is an important factor in CMP. The predictions of the model show reasonable agreement with the experimental observations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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